William D. Heyman
Associate Professor
Department of Geography
Texas A&M University


Contact Information
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(979) 845-5411

Education
Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Marine Sciences, 1996
M.S., University of South Carolina, Marine Sciences, 1992
B.S., Tufts University, Biology and Environmental Studies, 1987

Curriculum Vitae

Biography
I developed a broad interest in science and sustainable management of tropical coastal and marine systems from the time I was a child, snorkeling before I could walk. I graduated from Tufts University with a major in Marine Biology and Environmental Studies in 1983. I then spent three years working in marine aquaculture in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos, and the Marshall Islands. I did my MS and Ph.D. through the University of South Carolina, conducting field research in both the Marshall Islands and Belize, finishing in 1996. In 7 years of graduate work, I spent only 5 semesters in residence, gaining me the dubious honor of the student with the most degrees, and least amount of time on campus at USC. Meanwhile, I began working for the International Division of the Nature Conservancy in Belize where I lived for ten years. I am now an Associate Professor of Geography.

Research Interest
I am generally interested in the relationship between humans and the environment and utilize a multi-disciplinary approach to study these interactions. In addition to the science, I have dedicated myself to generating practical and useful guidance for resource managers. I collaborate with commercial fishermen; scientists from a wide set of disciplines; and marine area managers in state, federal, and non-government organizations. I use multi-disciplinary approaches to generate practical guidance for resource management and use remote sensing, and GIS. My recent research focuses on the ecology and management reef fish spawning aggregations, especially snappers and groupers. More generally I am interested in the relationship between underlying geomorphology and habitat for marine organisms as a means to provide ecosystem-based-management options and illuminate designs for marine reserve networks.

I have a great interest in providing entertaining, science-based education to my students and the general public, in hopes that this will lead to broad changes in environmental policy and sustainable management of marine resources. I have worked in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos Islands, the Marshall Islands, Honduras, Guatemala, Mexico, the Cayman Islands, Los Roques Venezuela, and most extensively in Belize.

  • Conservation biology
  • Marine protected areas
  • Human-environment interaction
  • Reproductive ecology of reef fish spawning aggregations
  • Land-sea interactions
  • Marine geomorphology
  • Ecosystem-based management
  • Belize, Caribbean

Professional Experience
Texas A&M University - Associate Professor of Geography
The Nature Conservancy - Meso-American Reef, Gulf of Honduras and Belize
Marine Science Program and Educational Foundation - University of South Carolina
Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority / Micronesia Program - Rep. of Marshall Islands Aquaculture Research Corporation - Maine
Eastern Research Group, Inc. - Maine
Trade Wind Industries Caicos Conch Farm - Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands, B.W.I.
Hummingbird Caye Foundation and Tufts University - Hummingbird Caye, Exuma, Bahamas
Eastern Research Group, Inc. - Arlington, Maine
Biology Department - Tufts University

Awards
NSF IGERT: Applied Biodiversity Science: Bridging Ecology, Culture, and Governance for Effective Conservation (Fitzgerald and Stronza are PIs, Dr. Heyman serves as one of 15 faculty participants and actively contributed to proposal development) approved for 2007-2012.

Mapping and Characterization of Snapper Spawning Aggregations in the Cayman Islands. Cayman Islands Department of Environment, Government of Cayman Islands, 2007.

Impacts of Global Change and the Management of Coastal Ecosystems of Antigua and Barbuda, Interim period funded by R. Allen Stanford. 2005-2012. Dr. Heyman serves as PI on the Coastal Management Component at Texas A&M.

Fisher Exchanges between Belize and Venezuela funded by United Nations Caribbean Environment Programme.

Selected Publications
 

Carr, L.M. and W.D. Heyman. 2009. Jamaica bound? Marine resources and management at a crossroads in Antigua and Barbuda. The Geographical Journal 175(1): 17-38.

Heyman, W.D. and B. Kjerfve. 2008. Characterization of transient multi-species reef fish spawning aggregations at Gladden Spit, Belize. Bulletin of Marine Science 83(3): 531-551.

Heyman, W.D., B. Kjerfve, and T. Ezer. 2008. Mesoamerican Reef spawning aggregations help maintain fish populations: a review of connectivity research and priorities for science and management. NOAA Marine Conservation Science Series. In press.

Kobara, S. and W.D. Heyman. 2008. Geomorphometric patterns of Nassau grouper (Epinephelus striatus) spawning aggregation sites in the Cayman Islands. Marine Geodesy 31:231-245.

Su, H., H. Liu, and W.D. Heyman. 2008. Automated derivation of bathymetric information from multi-spectral satellite imagery using a non-linear inversion model. Marine Geodesy 31: 281-298.

Wright, D.J. and W.D. Heyman. 2008. Introduction to the special issue: marine and coastal GIS for geomorphology, habitat mapping and marine reserves. Marine Geodesy 31: 1 - 8.

Sheng, J., L. Wang, S. Andréfouët, C. Hu, B.G. Hatcher, F.E. Muller-Karger, B. Kjerfve, W.D. Heyman, and B. Yang 2007. Upper ocean response of the Mesoamerican barrier reef system to Hurricane Mitch and coastal freshwater inputs: a study using Sea-viewing and Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) ocean color data and a nested-grid ocean circulation model. Journal of Geophysical Research. 112(C07016): 1-22.

Heyman, W.D., J-L. B. Ecochard, and F.B. Biasi. 2007. Low-cost bathymetric mapping for tropical marine conservation – a focus on reef fish spawning aggregation sites. Marine Geodesy 30(1): 37-50.

Ezer, T., D. V. Thattai, B. Kjerfve and W.D. Heyman. 2005. On the variability of the flow along the Meso-American Barrier Reef System: A numerical model study of the influence of the Caribbean Current and eddies. Ocean Dynamics. 55: 458-475.

Heyman, W.D., B. Kjerfve, K.L. Rhodes, R.T. Graham and L. Garbutt. 2005. Spawning aggregations of Lutjanus cyanopterus (Cuvier) on the Belize Barrier Reef over a 6 year period. Journal of Fish Biology 67(1): 83-101.

Gibson, J., M. McField, W. Heyman, S. Wells, J. Carter, and G. Sedberry. 2004. Belize’s evolving system of marine reserves. pp. 287-315. In: J. Sobel and C. Dahlgren, eds. Marine Reserves: A Guide to Science, Design and Use. The Ocean Conservancy, Washington. D.C.

Thattai, D., B. Kjerfve, and W.D. Heyman. 2003. Hydrometeorology and variability of water discharge and sediment load in the inner Gulf of Honduras, Western Caribbean. Journal of Hydrometeorology 4: 985-995.

Heyman, W.D., B, Kjerfve, R.E. Johannes, R. Graham. 2001.Whale sharks, Rhincodon typus, aggregate to feed on fish spawn in Belize. Marine Ecology Progress Series. 215: 275-282.

Heyman, W.D. and B. Kjerfve. 2000. The Gulf of Honduras.In: Seeliger, U. and B. Kjerfve (eds.) Coastal Marine Ecosystems of Latin America. Ecological Studies 144. Springer-Verlag, Berlin. Part I Part II

Heyman, W.D. and B. Kjerfve. 1999. Hydrological and oceanographic considerations for integrated coastal zone management in southern Belize. Environmental Management. 24(2): 229-245.

Heyman, W.D., and N. Skinner. 1993. Why build the sea on land? Appropriate technology mariculture for giant clams in the Marshall Islands. World Aquaculture24(2): 25-27.

Davis, M., W.D. Heyman and W. Harvey. 1988. Techniques for the commercial scale induction of metamorphosis in queen conch Strombus gigas (L.) larvae. Journal of Shellfish Research7: 546-547.

Davis, M., W.D. Heyman, W. Harvey, and C.A. Withstandley. 1990. A comparison of two inducers, KCl and Laurencia extracts, and techniques for the commercial scale induction of metamorphosis in Queen Conch Strombus gigas (L.) larvae. Journal of Shellfish Research 9(1): 67-73.

Heyman, W.D., R.A. Dobberteen, L.A. Urry, and A.M. Heyman. 1989. Pilot hatchery for the Queen Conch Strombus gigas uses inexpensive and appropriate technology for larval aquaculture in the Bahamas. Aquaculture77: 277-285.

Pechenik, J.A. and W.D. Heyman. 1987. Using KCl to determine size at competence for larvae of the marine gastropod Crepidula fornicata (L.). Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 112: 27-38.

Technical Reports and Popular Articles:

Heyman, W.D. 2008. The timing and location of reef fish spawning aggregations in Belize and the Cayman Islands: insights for the design of a protected areas network in the Gulf of Mexico. pp. 56-60 In, K.B. Ritchie and B.D. Keller, eds. A Scientific Forum on the Gulf of Mexico: The Islands in the Stream Concept. NOAA Marine Conservation Science Series. NMSP-08-04.

Heyman, W.D. and B. Wade. 2007. Status of reef fish spawning aggregations in Belize. Proceedings of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute58: 301-306.

Kobara, S. and W.D. Heyman. 2007. Caribbean-wide geospatial analysis of the location of transient reef fish spawning aggregation sites using remote sensing, Proceedings of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute59: 463-466.

Burke, L. and Z. Sugg, with contributions from W. Heyman and S. Kobara, L. Cherubin, C. Kuchinke, C. Paris, and J. Kool. 2006. Hydrologic modeling of watersheds discharging adjacent to the Mesoamerican Reef. World Resources Institute. 1 December 2006. 35pp.

Heyman, W.D. and G. Adrien. 2006. A protocol and database for monitoring transient multi-species reef fish spawning aggregations in the Mesoamerican reef. Proceedings of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute 57: 445-462.

Heyman, W.D. 2004. Conservation of multi-species spawning aggregation sites. Proceedings of the Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute. 55: 521-529.

Heyman W.D. and N. Requena with inputs from M. Paz, H. Hidaldo, J.A. Fuentes, E. Sosa, K. Rhodes, and B. Kjerfve. 2003. Fish spawning aggregations in the MBRS region: recommendations for monitoring and management. Consultancy Final Report. Technical Document # 16. Conservation and Sustainable Use of the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef Systems Project (MBRS). Belize City, Belize. http://www.mbrs.org.bz/dbdocs/tech/Protocol16.pdf

Heyman and Requena. 2002. Multi-species spawning aggregations in Belize. The Nature Conservancy. Punta Gorda, Belize.

Heyman, W. and R. Graham, eds. 2000. The Voice of the Fishermen of Southern Belize. Toledo Institute for Development and Environment. Punta Gorda, Belize.

Heyman, W. and R. Graham, eds. 2000. La Voz de los Pescadores de la Costa Atlántida de Guatemala. Fundación para el Ecodesarrollo de Guatemala (FUNDAECO)y Toledo Institute for Development and Environment (TIDE). Punta Gorda, Belize

Heyman, W. and R. Graham, eds. 2000. La Voz de los Pescadores de la Costa Norte de Honduras. PROLANSATE y Toledo Institute for Development and Environment (TIDE). Punta Gorda, Belize.

Heyman, W. and T. Hyatt. 1996. An analysis of commercial and sport fishing in the proposed Port Honduras Marine Reserve. Belize Center for Environmental Studies. Belize City, Belize.

Heyman, W.D. W. Maheia, S. Franklin, and L. Nicolait. 1995. Maya Mountain - Marine Area Transect: A synthesis to assist in integrated planning and management. Belize Center for Environmental Studies. Belize City, Belize.

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Texas A&M University - Associate Professor of Geography
The Nature Conservancy - Meso-American Reef, Gulf of Honduras and Belize
Marine Science Program
Educational Foundation - University of South Carolina
Marshall Islands Marine Resources Authority / Micronesia Program - Republic of Marshall Islands
Aquaculture Research Corporation – Massachusetts
Eastern Research Group, Inc. – Arlington, Massachusetts
Trade Wind Industries Caicos Conch Farm - Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands
Hummingbird Caye Foundation and Tufts University - Hummingbird Caye, Exuma, Bahamas
Biology Department - Tufts University

 


Dr. Heyman and Ph.D. student Liam Carr discuss a dive on a spawning aggregation site off Buck Island National Park in St. Croix.


Bue, Island, Mili Atoll, Marshall Islands. Heyman lived in this lagoon for 14 months while completing his MS degree on giant clam aquaculture. He used the dingy for commuting back and forth to work.